A skin patch instead of a vaccine?

It is easy to administer using T cells to kill the infected cells and could offer longer lasting immunity, than the current vaccination. We are told that Pfizer BionTech and Astra Zeneca jabs also produce a T cell response, but to a lesser degree.

 

by Victor Cherubim

Some months ago, I wrote about skin patches as the future of medicinal technological research. Hardly, did I expect a skin patch instead of vaccines as next in line development for Coronavirus immunisation and that these patches will help to remove infected cells from the body quickly thus preventing viral replication. 

This is the brainchild of Professor Thomas Rademacher, Professor Emeritus of Molecular Medicine at University College London School of Medicine and currently Chief Executive, Emergex, Switzerland.

Advantage of administration

It is easy to administer using T cells to kill the infected cells and could offer longer lasting immunity, than the current vaccination. We are told that Pfizer BionTech and Astra Zeneca jabs also produce a T cell response, but to a lesser degree. 

This is according to a recent lab study on mice conducted by a team at University of Queensland, Australia, as well as scientists from Stanford University and University of North Carolina who have collaborated to make a 3d printed Vaccine Skin Patch for COVID-19. Technological research as my readers will note, knows no national boundaries.

It is easy to administer but the advantage is that it could offer longer lasting immunity than the current vaccines. Many will know according to science that Corona virus could become endemic and that booster vaccines will be needed regularly, perhaps, due to the mutation of the virus. Besides, the skin patch can be stored at room temperature and can also be self-administered, making it further suitable for use in a place that lack cold storage facilities and medical staff. 

These Skin Patches may pose a better option for people afraid of needles or experiencing needle pain in the shoulder arm muscle. Whether, skin patches for COVID-19 will convince the Anti-Vax sceptics to try it as a less scary option, is still doubtful. 

First Human Trials

The trial by Emergex has received the green light to conduct initial human trials in Lausanne Switzerland, involving 26 people who will receive a high and low dose starting as early as 3 January 2022. Results from these trials are expected in June 2022. 

Technical research has made the vaccine patch work by delivering the “Spike Protein” to the “epidermis”. 

In layman’s language, the viral code is fired into the outer skin surface and the signature is read by the “T Cells” as foreign, and the “T Cells can kill the cell before it can produce new live Corona virus to infect the lung.” Our skin is the interface for our body and it is so sensitive, that it understands the need to mount immune responses, protecting our body. 

This medical “T Cell” technology is known as “Microneedle Patch” which is now used to deliver Insulin,among other drugs.

Where do we go from here, is what scientific research will discover in due time. 

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